Tribal abduction project

An inspiring painting by one of Australia’s leading Aboriginal artists and Territorians Harold Thomas, about the legacy of generational trauma suffered by members of the Stolen Generation.

In 2016, Paspalis purchased Tribal Abduction, the overall winner of the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards (NATSIAA) with the objective to see it displayed in a prominent and worthy public space to ensure maximum exposure and impact for both Australians and international visitors alike.

In 2018, this artwork was loaned to Charles Darwin University where it is temporarily hung for public view in the lobby of its Chancery Building.  The Paspalis Group of Companies is grateful to Professor Simon Maddox, Vice Chancellor of Charles Darwin University for his leadership and support ensuring this important work of art has an appropriate and respectful home in such a prestigious and esteemed place of learning.

Our goal is to work with the Australian Government Office of the Arts and the Northern Territory Government to ultimately see this work exhibited in an appropriately built national and / or cultural institution and then donated under the Australian Cultural Gifts Program.

This inspiring painting by one of Australia’s leading Aboriginal artists and Territorian Harold Thomas, himself a member of the Stolen Generations, speaks to the legacy of generational trauma suffered by members of the Stolen Generations.  This magnificent work of art has received both national and international acclaim in such publications as the Australian, Sydney Morning Herald and London Times describing it as a work of great historical significance providing space for cathartic reflection and healing.

This acquisition represents an important civic project for Australia realising Harold Thomas’ dream, for Tribal Abduction to be a painting that communicates and heals on a global scale.

“With traditional (Aboriginal) art, the art of my ancestors, you couldn’t express it — it’s not there. That’s what I believe. It’s probably a picture that people wanted to have out in the community. We needed a painting like that (and) I hadn’t seen it.” Harold Thomas – Artist